Good Enough

Dec 11, 2008

Richard Gotthardt

Most people I know believe that they are good, or at least as good as the next person.  Right there, that’s the problem- the next person.  Makes sense, I suppose- if we imagine that God takes a magical scale of goodness, weighs us all out, then does a kind of divine averaging.  I suppose He could do that, if that were the best way to determine goodness.  Imagine, though, applying that kind of standard to let’s say, your brain surgeon’s intelligence and skill measured against that of every other person.  Do you want “as good as the next person” operating on you?  I’m thinking you’d set the bar a bit higher.

So where does the bar for “goodness” get set?  Who sets it?  Read on for a great analogy by Max Lucado…

Author Max Lucado writes:

All of us occasionally do what is right. A few predominately do what is right. But do any of us always do what is right? According to Paul we don’t. “There is none righteous, no, not one” (Rom. 3:10, NKJV).

Some may beg to differ. “I’m not perfect, Max, but I’m better than most folks. I’ve led a good life. I don’t break the rules. I don’t break hearts. I help people. I like people. Compared to others, I think I could say I’m a righteous person.”

I used to try that on my mother. She’d tell me that my room wasn’t clean, and I’d ask her to go with me to my brother’s room. His was always messier than mine. “See, my room is clean; just look at his.”

Never worked. She’d walk me down the hall to her room. When it came to tidy rooms, my mom was righteous. Her closet was just right. Her bed was just right. Her bathroom was just right. Compared to hers, my room was, well, just wrong. She would show me her room and say, “This is what I mean by clean.”

God does the same. He points to himself and says, “This is what I mean by righteousness.”

Max Lucado, Traveling Light

Richard’s Ramblings

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